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27 June 2017

Shi-Jiang Li, PhD, Receives 2017 Alzheimer Award

Shi-Jiang Li, PhD

JAD is pleased to announce that Shi-Jiang Li, PhD, Professor of Biophysics, Radiology, and Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin, has been chosen as the recipient of the 2017 Alzheimer Award. It has been presented by the journal in recognition of his outstanding work on the development of the CARE index, potentially a significant new tool in the battle against Alzheimer’s disease (AD) that can be used to characterize risks associated with AD stages and quantify disease severity on an individual subject basis.

8 June 2017

Culprit hidden in plain sight in Alzheimer’s disease development: Combustion-derived nanoparticles in key brain target cells and organelles in young urbanites

A new study by researchers at the University of Montana, Universidad del Valle de México, Instituto Nacional de Pediatría, Boise State, and Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, heightens concerns over the detrimental short- and long-term impact of airborne iron-rich strongly magnetic combustion-derived nanoparticles (CDNPs) present in young urbanites’ brains. The researchers documented by abundant combustion nanoparticles in neurons, glial cells, choroid plexus, and neurovascular units of Mexico City children, teens and young adults chronically exposed to concentrations above the US-EPA standards for fine particulate matter.

19 May 2017

Can Omega-3 Help Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease? Brain SPECT Imaging Shows Possible Link

The incidence of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is expected to triple in the coming decades and no cure has been found. Recently, interest in dietary approaches for prevention of cognitive decline has increased. In particular, the omega-3 fatty acids have shown anti-amyloid, anti-tau and anti-inflammatory actions in the brains of animals. In a new article published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, researchers have found that for patients with high omega-3 levels, blood flow in specific areas of the brain is increased.

17 May 2017

Diagnostic biomarkers in saliva show promise in recognizing early Alzheimer’s disease

Beaumont logo

Your spit may hold a clue to future brain health. Investigators at the Beaumont Research Institute, part of Beaumont Health in Michigan, are hopeful that their study involving small molecules in saliva will help identify those at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease - a neurologic condition predicted to reach epidemic proportions worldwide by 2050.

8 May 2017

Prediction of Conversion to Alzheimer’s Disease with Longitudinal Measures and Time-To-Event Data

Sheng Luo

Predicting the timing of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) conversion for individuals with mild cognitive impairment can be significantly improved by incorporating longitudinal change information of clinical and neuroimaging markers, in addition to baseline characteristics, according to projections made by investigators from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. The research team describes how their novel statistical models found that longitudinal measurements of ADAS-Cog was the strongest predictor for AD progression and the predictive utility was consistently significant with progression of disease.

4 May 2017

Better quality relationships associated with reduced dementia risk

University of East Anglia

Positive social support from adult children is associated with reduced risk of developing dementia, according to a new research published today. Conversely, negative social support is linked with increased risk, according to the 10-year follow-up study carried out by a team of researchers from the University of East Anglia (UEA), University College London (UCL), London Metropolitan University and the University of Nottingham.

14 April 2017

Detecting Alzheimer’s disease earlier using … Greebles?

Emily Mason

Unique graphic characters called Greebles may prove to be valuable tools in detecting signs of Alzheimer’s disease decades before symptoms become apparent. In an article published online last week in JAD, Emily Mason, Ph.D., a postdoctoral associate in the Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Louisville, reported research showing that cognitively normal people who have a genetic predisposition for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have more difficulty distinguishing among novel figures called Greebles than individuals without genetic predisposition.

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