Share Us: Email Icon Facebook icon Twitter Icon GooglePlus Icon Facebook Like icon   Subscribe | Contact

User Top Menu

Latest News

20 January 2016

Alzheimer’s Diagnosis Complicated by History of Reading Problems

Brian Lebowitz

Correctly diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease remains a challenge for medical professionals. Now, a new study published in the current issue of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease reveals a new clue to possible misdiagnosis. The study found that older adults with a history of reading problems perform similarly on some neuropsychological tests to those who show signs of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) associated with early Alzheimer’s disease. The finding, based on the results of a Stony Brook University-led research team in collaboration with Boston University School of Medicine, emphasizes the need for professionals to take into account developmental history and have a broad understanding of neuropsychological testing when interpreting the meaning of low memory test scores.

18 January 2016

Omega-3 levels affect whether B vitamins can slow brain’s decline

University of Oxford

While research has already established that B vitamin supplements can help slow mental decline in older people with memory problems, an international team have now found that having higher levels of Omega-3 fatty acids in your body could boost the B vitamins’ effect. The team, from the Universities of Cape Town, Oslo, Oxford and the UAE, studied more than 250 people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in Oxford. MCI is when brain function is below what is normally expected for a person’s age but is not significant enough to interfere with daily life. While it is not as serious as dementia, if untreated it often progresses to become dementia.

16 December 2015

Link Between Anemia and Mild Cognitive Impairment

Martha Dlugaj

In a large population-based study of randomly selected participants in Germany, researchers found that participants with anemia, defined as haemoglobin less than 13 g/dl in men and less than 12 g/dl in women, showed lower performances in verbal memory and executive functions. Furthermore, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) occurred almost twice more often in participants diagnosed with anemia. This study is published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

9 December 2015

Early stage dementia patients referred to specialists are institutionalized twice as often as those who are not

A new epidemiologic study showed that patients with early stage dementia, who had been referred to a specialist, have twice the risk of institutionalization compared to those who are not, according to a research study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease this month. The research suggested the influence of early specialist referral for dementia patients on institutionalization risk and demonstrated that the benefits of early dementia diagnosis may lead to challenging issues.

11 November 2015

Reproductive history and risk of cognitive impairment in elderly women: a cross-sectional study in eastern China

Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Researchers led by Professor Jun-Fen Lin at Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention have found that reproductive history, an important modifier of estrogen exposure across women’s lifetime, is associated with risk of cognitive impairment in postmenopausal women. These findings are published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

10 November 2015

Changes in humour may be an early sign of dementia

Pearse family

Researchers at University College London (UCL) have revealed that a change in sense of humour could be an early sign of dementia. The findings could help improve dementia diagnosis, by highlighting changes not commonly thought to be linked to the condition. The study was funded by Alzheimer’s Research UK, the Wellcome Trust, Medical Research Council (MRC) and NIHR Queen Square Dementia Biomedical Research Unit. The research was published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease on 10 November 2015.

9 November 2015

Blood test detects pre-Alzheimer’s in Mexican-Americans with 96 percent accuracy

Sid O’Bryant, PhD

A blood test developed at the University of North Texas Health Science Center detects pre-Alzheimer’s disease in asymptomatic Mexican-Americans with 96 percent accuracy. The test used blood samples provided by participants in the university’s Health & Aging Brain Among Latino Elders (HABLE) study. Hundreds of older Mexican-American residents from the Fort Worth area have participated in this study, which seeks to understand aging in this underserved population.

Pages

Subscribe to Latest News