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22 December 2016

Occupational therapy may have the potential to slow down functional decline and reduce behavioral troubles in dementia patients

A French observational study in real life showed that dementia patients benefiting from occupational therapy sessions report relevant clinical benefits over the intervention period, according to a research study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease this month. The research suggested the influence of occupational therapy on reducing behavioral troubles, caregivers’ burden and amount of informal care over the intervention period and a stabilization over the 3-months period thereafter.

21 December 2016

Penn Study Confirms That “Sniff Test” May Be Useful in Diagnosing Early Alzheimer’s Disease

David R. Roalf

Tests that measure the sense of smell may soon become common in neurologists’ offices. Scientists have been finding increasing evidence that the sense of smell declines sharply in the early stages of Alzheimer’s, and now a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania published today in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease confirms that administering a simple “sniff test” can enhance the accuracy of diagnosing this dreaded disease.

19 December 2016

JAD’s Alzheimer Funding Analyzer Now Includes Alzheimer’s Association Grants

Journal of Alzheimer's Disease

The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease (JAD) is pleased to announce that its Alzheimer’s Funding Analyzer (AFA) now includes all Alzheimer’s Association (AA) grants in addition to grants from other funding bodies. AFA is a free service that is part of a suite of online features integrated into the JAD site to meet the needs of the Alzheimer disease (AD) research community.

16 December 2016

Antipsychotic drug use increases risk of mortality among persons with Alzheimer’s disease

University of Eastern Finland

Antipsychotic drug use is associated with a 60 percent increased risk of mortality among persons with Alzheimer's disease, shows a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland. The risk was highest at the beginning of drug use and remained increased in long-term use. Use of two or more antipsychotic drugs concomitantly was associated with almost two times higher risk of mortality than monotherapy. The results were published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

14 December 2016

Promising discovery for a non-invasive early detection of Alzheimer’s disease

VBM analyses

Drs. Maccioni and Farías have pioneered the technology that detects in human blood platelets the pathological oligomeric forms of brain tau protein in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. More importantly, the ratio between this anomalous tau and the normal tau protein can discriminate AD patients from normal controls, and are associated with decreased cognitive impairment. These studies open a new avenue in the development of highly sensitive and efficient biomarkers for neurodegenerative disorders.

8 December 2016

Higher BMI in Adolescence May Affect Cognitive Function in Midlife

Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Overweight and obesity in adolescents have increased substantially in recent decades, and today affect a third of the adolescent population in some developed countries. While the dangers posed by high adult BMI on cognitive function in later life have been documented, the association of adolescent BMI with cognitive function in midlife has not yet been reported.

8 December 2016

New tool to help predict dementia risk in older people

University of Eastern Finland

A machine learning method analyzing large amounts of health information has potential in assessing the risk of cognitively healthy older people for later dementia, according to research published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. The new risk assessment tool also presents the individual risk profile in a quickly interpretable visual form.

27 November 2016

New Study Shows Marijuana Users have Low Blood Flow to the Brain

Brain image of healthy person versus daily user of marijuana

As the U.S. races to legalize marijuana for medicinal and recreational use, a new, large scale brain imaging study gives reason for caution. Published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, researchers using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), a sophisticated imaging study that evaluates blood flow and activity patterns, demonstrated abnormally low blood flow in virtually every area of the brain studies in nearly 1,000 marijuana compared to healthy controls, including areas known to be affected by Alzheimer’s pathology such as the hippocampus.

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